The Power of the Unconversation

On the 9th of March 2017 twelve enthusiastic Foundery members attended DevConf 2017, South Africa’s biggest community driven software development conference: an event that promised learning, inspiration and networking.

Courtesy of DevConf 2017 (devconf.co.za)

On the 9th of March 2017 twelve enthusiastic Foundery members attended DevConf 2017, South Africa’s biggest community driven software development conference: an event that promised learning, inspiration and networking.

With a multi-tracked event such as this one there is usually something for everyone, and yet if you speak to serial conference attendees (guilty as charged), the talks aren’t the greatest reason to attend.

People like me go to conferences in part for the scheduled content, but mostly for the unscheduled conversations in the passage en route to a talk or around a cocktail table during a break. The “unconversations”, I’m calling them. It’s the conference equivalent of another well-known creative outlet: “water cooler conversations”.

I’ll admit that I’m a bit of a conference butterfly – actively seeking out these “unconversations” so that I can join them. I especially take note as crowds disappear into conference rooms. I’m drawn to the groups of people who stay behind wherever they might have gathered. That’s where I’m almost guaranteed to participate in really interesting discussions and learn something new. When I attend conferences, it’s this organic and informal style of collaborative enquiry I look forward to the most.

Courtesy of DevConf 2017 (devconf.co.za)

Ironically it was one of the DevConf talks that helped me understand why these “unconversations” tend to work so well as creative spaces. In his talk on Mob Programming, Mark Pearl mentioned a study conducted by the American Psychological Association which established that groups of 3-5 people perform better on complex problem solving than the smartest person in the group could perform on their own. See “references” for more information.

Loosely translated, a group of people has a better shot of solving a complex problem together than if they tried to solve it independently.

As a Mob Programming enthusiast myself, this makes complete sense to me. What’s interesting is that this research is not new, yet many organisations still discourage “expensive” group-work and continue to reward individual performance, and I can see why. For people with similar upbringings and educational backgrounds to mine, this is the comfort zone. We default to working alone and feel a sense of accomplishment when we achieve success individually. As children we were told to solve problems and find answers on our own. Receiving help was a sign of weakness, and copying was forbidden.

In contrast, the disruptive organisations of the last few decades encourage the complete opposite. These organisations recognise the value of problem-solving with groups of people who have varying, and even conflicting, perspectives. There’s no time for old-school mindsets that favour individual efforts over collaboration. We need to cheat where it’s appropriate by knowing who can help us and what existing ideas we can leverage.

I don’t mean to trivialise it. There’s a bit more involved than just creating opportunities for people to solve problems in groups. According to the book “Collective Genius”, innovative companies such as Google have developed three important organisational capabilities: creative abrasion (idea generation by encouraging conflict and high quality feedback), creative agility (hypothesizing, experimenting, learning and adapting) and creative resolution (deciding on a solution after taking new knowledge into account) all supported by a unique style of leadership. The case studies are incredibly motivating.

Since joining the Foundery I’m discovering that we are practicing these things every day, and the amazing ideas and products born from our “collective genius” serve as confirmation that we’re on the right track. Is it always easy? No, absolutely not. It’s requires a great deal of mindfulness.

When I’m reflective I notice that the greatest ideas and most creative solutions I’ve brought to life were conceived with input from others. Many of the dots I connected for the first time happened during completely unlikely meetings of minds, and some through passionate differences of opinion. In an environment that calls for constant collaboration, it’s wonderfully refreshing to find that the “unconversations” I enjoy so much are happening all around me, every day.

And so long as I’m participating, I am always reminded that together we are more capable of solving really complex problems than the smartest one among us, and I’m becoming more and more OK with that.

References:

By Candice Mesk

 

The Doosra

Working in an investment bank over the past decade has provided the opportunity for many interesting conversations around what the value to society of an investment bank represents. Often the model of a “zero sum game” is proposed which suggests that finance often doesn’t add much – in terms of the transactions that banks facilitate, someone is a winner and someone else is the loser, there is no net gain to the world. Other purists would argue something along the lines of efficient allocation of resources. That initially sounded a bit too creative for my more linear reasoning, but after years in the trenches, it has developed an intuitive ring of truth to it.

Working in an investment bank over the past decade has provided the opportunity for many interesting conversations around what the value to society of an investment bank represents. Often the model of a “zero sum game” is proposed which suggests that finance often doesn’t add much – in terms of the transactions that banks facilitate, someone is a winner and someone else is the loser, there is no net gain to the world. Other purists would argue something along the lines of efficient allocation of resources. That initially sounded a bit too creative for my more linear reasoning, but after years in the trenches, it has developed an intuitive ring of truth to it.

Similarly, digital disruption suffers a questionable motive. For some enterprises, such as Uber, it may appear that the shiny plaything of some young geeks on the west coast of america has been allowed to plough through the livelihoods of real people with real jobs and families around the world. When applying such thinking to digital disruption in the realm of investment banking, the question arises as to whether there is any real value that this rather obscure digital offspring of an already often questioned enterprise can produce.

At times this line of thinking led me to check my own passion for this “new vector of commerce”. How do I ensure that my natural fascination with some “new and shiny” geek toy is not diverting what should be a cold, objective application of technology to investment banking, rather than being an excuse to pursue disruption for its own sake. How do we ensure a golden thread of validity and meaning to this exercise.

I started thinking about Google, and how I could justify what value they might have brought to the world (and not just their shareholders). I won’t pretend that I spent much time on this question, but I did come to the following example. Google maps is a fantastic application, and I probably initially loved it more for the fact that in this we have an application that is bringing the real world (travel, maps, my phone, my car) together with the digital world (the internet, GPS technology, cloud based algorithms).

However, it is a tool that many people use, and its value extends beyond that initial fascination. I have considered that in a very real way there are likely to be hundreds of millions of people that might use google maps every day to guide them on an optimal route in their cars. And, true to form, it manages to do this: either by advising detours around potential traffic jams, or by merely showing quicker routes that save time.

That extra time in traffic that has been avoided represents a very real saving in carbon emissions into the atmosphere, and real energy that would have been wasted pumping cylinders up and down in an idling vehicle. This is not a zero sum equation where google benefits and many small companies lose out. This is a very real benefit to the world where increased efficiency reduces the amount of wasted energy, and wasted time of humans. This is a net positive game to the world. In some respect the world of humans win, and the domain of entropy loses – if we are forced to put a name to it.

Personally I would feel deeply gratified if I could produce such a result that created a new benefit to either the world, or at the very least some small piece of it.

Interestingly enough, this speaks to an underlying theme which appeals to many people that are attracted to incubators of disruption, such as the Foundery. Many people do really feel that they would like to be part of something that changes the world. Perhaps this is because such incubators invoke the perceived “spirit” of Google, Facebook and other silicon valley heroes as an inspirational rally cry. I believe that the example of google maps does show that the present opportunity of disruptive technology can represent a possibility for such very real efficiencies and benefits to be created. Perhaps those seemingly naive passions that are stirred in the incubatees are valid, and should be released to find their form in the world.

So how do we harness this latent energy? Where do we direct it for the best chance of success?

Some of the technologies to be harnessed, and which represent the opportunity of disruptive technology:

  1. IoT (the internet of things):

At its most simple, this means that various electronic components have become sufficiently small, powerful and most importantly, cheap. It can become possible and economically viable to monitor the temperature, humidity, soil hydration of every single plant in a field of a farm. To measure the status of every machine on a production line in a small factory in the east rand, without bankrupting the owner with implementation costs.

Apart from sensors, there are actuators in the world such as smart locks, smart lights and the smart home which enable real-world actions to be driven and controlled from the internet. Together these provide the mechanism for the real world to be accessible to the digital world.

This extends beyond the “real“ real world: there are changes at play, not too far under the surface of the modern financial system, that are turning the real world of financial “things” (shares, bonds, financial contracts) into the internet world of financial “things” (dematerialised and digitised shares, bonds online, financial contracts online).

There are also actuators in this world, such as electronic trading venues and platforms which enable manipulation of digital financial contracts by digital actors of finance.

  1. Data is free:

The cost per megabyte of storage continues to drop exponentially, and online providers are able to offer services on a rental basis that would have been inconceivable a decade ago. The ubiquity of cheap and fast bandwidth enables this even more so.

  1. Computation is cheaper than ever, and simple to locate with cloud based infrastructure:

Moore’s law continues unabated, providing computational power that drops in cost by the day. Notwithstanding the promise of quantum computing which seems around the corner

  1. The technologies to utilize are powerful, free and easy to learn:

If you have not yet done so, have a sojourn on the internet across such topics as python, tensorflow, quandl, airflow and github. These represent free, open-source (largely) capabilities to harness the technologies above and make them your plaything. Not only that, the amount of free resources “out there” which can help you master each of these is astounding.

A brief exercise into trying to automate my house using python has revealed hundreds of youtube videos of similarly obsessed crazies presenting fantastic applications of python to automating everything from their garage doors, fishtanks, pool chlorine management systems, alarms etc. These youtube videos are short, to the point, educational, free and most importantly crowd moderated – all the other python home automation geeks have ensured that all the very good videos are upvoted and easily found; and the least fit are doomed to obscurity.

This represents another perhaps unforeseen benefit of the internet which is crowd-sourced, crowd-moderated, efficient and specific education. JIT learning (“just in time learning”) which means being able to learn everything that you need to accomplish a task five minutes before you need to solve it, and perhaps to forget everything almost immediately once you have solved it…. (That is an interesting paradigm to counter traditional education).

( P.S. if you have kids, or want to learn other stuff, checkout https://www.khanacademy.org/ )

Given the above points, it has never been easier for someone to create a capability to source information in real time from the real world, store that information online, apply unheard of computing power to that information using new, powerful and easy programming languages which can be learned online in a short period of time.

It might be a moot point that is valid at every point in time in every generation, but it has never been easier and cheaper to try out an idea online and see if it has legs.

So we have identified people with passion, a means of delivery and so now … what?

Those of you that are paying attention would realise that I have skirted the question of whether we have added any real value to the world, or feel that we can? Time will tell, and I would hate to let the cat out of the bag too early. But there is one thing that is true: if you are one of those misguided, geek-friendly, meaning-seeking, after hours change agents, or if you have an idea that could change the world, come and talk to us … the door is always open.

by Glenn Brickhill

Design Indaba made me do it –

This was the mantra for the 22nd annual Design Indaba conference, hosted by the beautiful city of Cape Town at the Artscape theater.

This was the mantra for the 22nd annual Design Indaba conference, hosted by the beautiful city of Cape Town at the Artscape theater.

The Design Indaba Conference has grown to become one of the world’s leading design events and hosts more than 40 speakers and 2 500 delegates. It draws creatives from all spheres and industries to come together under one roof to share knowledge, inspire and to collaborate with one another.

We talked, mingled and networked; filing our inspiration tanks. There were graffiti artists, dj’s, musicians, sculptors and various sponsor pop-ups and activation units, inviting us into this world of endless possibility and creativity.

Contrary to current perception, Design Indaba is not a conference ONLY for creatives – it is for everyone, from any field of expertise that would like to ignite their senses and intrigue their minds. It’s a jam packed 3 days and I believe that there is something that will speak to anyone’s core. This year was my first Design Indaba and it was a truly immersive experience, exceeding all my expectations.

The main highlight for me, wasn’t the skill or talent of all these amazing people (even though that was incredible) – but rather their thinking, this really stood out to me; they took us on a journey through the lens and into their magical minds!

Ultimately, Design Indaba wants to change the thinking of the world, one conference at a time, one creative at a time, and one business at a time.

It will take a generation of creative thinkers and implementers to see a turnaround. Design Indaba’s primary aim therefore is “to advance the cause of design as a communication fundamental, a business imperative and a powerful tool in industry and commerce, awakening and driving a demand for investment in intellectual capital”.

Investing nearly two decades in this vision, Design Indaba has championed the creative revolution. Here are some of my highlights from the 3-day event (content supplied from the Design Indaba weekly mailer):

The enchanted forest – Can beauty redeem us?

We were welcomed into the Design Indaba Festival 2017 through an enchanted forest of massive tree sculptors that were beautiful and surreal.

These tree sculptures were on exhibition the entire conference and created a magical ambience to the atmosphere in the festival court yard. I felt like I was walking around in a world that was a mash-up of the movies, Labyrinth and Alice in Wonderland (Tim Burton version).

Read more >

Capturing Cape Town’s scent with Kaja Solgaard Dahl

The thank-you gift for the festival this year was created by this designer, Kaja Dahl, she is fascinated with creativity that uplifts our experience and affect the senses directly.

Her process and the end-product is captivating and just incredible. She truly did capture the scent of Cape Town –whimsical, fresh, enlighten, yet eccentric.

Read more >

Masters in the art of freestyling it

One of my main highlights of the festival was the amazing group called Freestyle Love Supreme. They would wrap up each day with freestyle rap and beat boxing. They were so entertaining and funny, I laughed so hard that may face hurt.

The Design Indaba team chatted to Freestyle Love Supreme ahead of their Design Indaba daily wrap ups and once-off performance on the Thursday at Nightscape.

Read more >

 

 

Swahili launches on Duolingo

At Design Indaba 2017, Luis Von Ahn launches the first African language course on Duolingo. The audience went wild when he told us, he then went on to say that the second African language they will be launching will be Zulu. We can’t wait to see more African languages on this amazing app.

Read more >

Arch For Arch: A coda for Design Indaba Festival Day 3

The spectacular finale of the 2017 Conference and a tribute to Archbishop Desmond Tutu. It was a great honor and privilege for me to be a part of this amazing ceremony and to hear the incredible and humble, Archbishop Desmond Tutu talk. It was a great way to end the amazing festival, I left feeling inspired

Read more >

Thank you for the wonderful experience and we are looking forward to where they go from here.

So, if you think that design indaba isn’t for you – think again. Book your ticket for next year and immerse yourself.

by Mari-Liza Monteiro

 

 

 

 

Why it took 400 years to invent the wing

You would be forgiven for thinking the three photographs below were various “Wright Flyers” piloted by renowned flight pioneers Wilbur and Orville Wright. They’re not – They are photographs of different flights that took place at roughly the same time…

THE MYSTERY OF SIMULTANEOUS INVENTION

You would be forgiven for thinking the three photographs below were various “Wright Flyers” piloted by renowned flight pioneers Wilbur and Orville Wright.

NPS.gov
NPS.gov
Wright-brothers.org
Wright-brothers.org

 

Wright-brothers.org
Wright-brothers.org

They’re not – They are photographs of different flights that took place at roughly the same time as the famous Wright brothers’ flight. Not all of these inventors knew of each other’s existence prior to their inventions. This bizarre case of “simultaneous invention” has occurred many times before, and since, the Wright brothers’ flight. The polio vaccine was developed by three separate scientists almost at once. The patent for the telephone was filed by two separate individuals on the same day.

Why does innovation occur simultaneously? We tend to have an idealised view of how scientists work. We have a picture of an individual in a workshop making a few sketches and shouting out in joy at having thought of the wing. If this was indeed the case, then the occurrence of simultaneous inventions would almost defy logic.

The reality is that the inventors and innovators captivate the views, thoughts and ideas of their day as well as existing technology, and it is this trait, that explains the phenomenon of simultaneous discovery.

The story of fixed-wing self-powered flight

The first recorded study of flight was Leonardo Da Vinci’s “Codex on the Flight of Birds” in 1505. John Smeaton was the first to attempt to quantify the phenomenon of lift prior to 1800. Using the concept of lift, George Cayley just after 1800 conceived the concept of cambered airfoil and made the world’s first glider. The glider could barely move any practical distance. Otto Lilienthal, in 1889, took experimentation to a new level. By absorbing the thoughts of his day, he made an astonishing 2500 glides and documented his findings in the famous “Lilienthal tables”. The Wright brothers could not emulate the data in the Lilienthal tables because of an error in the concept developed by Smeaton over 100 years earlier. Out of frustration, they went over and above Lilienthal’s experiments by creating the world’s first rudimentary wind tunnel. They realised that “camber”, “aspect ratios” and “angle of attack” all contributed to various lifts. And so, 398 years after its first study, Wright Wing Number 31 was selected for the historic flight. The wing, by itself, was insufficient for the flight – they had to procure the latest internal combustion engine to power the plane. Luckily for them, this had been developed in parallel, and with its own intricate history. The Wright brothers, by profession, were bicycle manufacturers, not backyard inventors or carpenters – the perfect candidates for flight pioneers. Think light weight rivets, spokes, wheel rims and tubes.

The Adjacent Possible explains simultaneous discovery

The same fascinating story can be found in numerous other inventions such as the Gutenburg press. The movable type, the press, paper and ink all have stories of the their own. And few of them were traced back to “Eureka” moments. Steven Johnson first proposed the concept of an adjacent possible which originally has its roots in microbiology. As Steven Johnson writes in the Wall Street Journal:

“the [adjacent possible] boundaries grow as you explore them. Each new combination opens up the possibility of other new combinations. Think of it as a house that magically expands with each door you open. You begin in a room with four doors, each leading to a new room that you haven’t visited yet. Once you open one of those doors and stroll into that room, three new doors appear, each leading to a brand-new room that you couldn’t have reached from your original starting point. Keep opening new doors and eventually you’ll have built a palace.”

We can therefore argue that no matter how much of a genius Da Vinci was, he could not have possibly made a flying machine back in 1505. He was not at the boundary of the adjacent possible. He most certainly contributed to it as he was part of the enlightenment and laid the early foundations of putting innovative thoughts on paper. John Smeaton’s lift equation was wrong but it was a critical contribution in that it attempted to quantify the mysterious phenomena of lift into an equation and enabled Otto Lilienthal to record his famous tables.

What can Fintech Learn about the Adjacent Possible?

The story of the wing is an extreme case study of iterative innovations towards a single invention.

Players in the Fintech space could learn from this theme. Innovation happens on the boundaries of the adjacent possible. For example, crypto currencies could not be implemented prior to the ability to hold distributed ledgers on multiple databases connected in a common consortiumEureka moments are indeed rare. Innovation initiatives should reach out to the world to absorb the thoughts and ideas of the day. Businesses should look within their own boundaries to find their own “Lilienthal tables” – to see what worked and what didn’t, in order to innovate effectively.

The Palau island tribes did, in theory, implement a blockchain in 500AD but the “ledger” was effectively narratives held by the tribes elders

by Dejan Popovic

Which race are you in?

As we hurtle head on in 2017 its becoming increasingly clear that no matter what generation you find yourself in – Xers embracing tech, Y’s passionately living the dream or Z pushing us all faster than we ever believed we could go – if you are not concentrating…this digital world will run right past before you blink.

http://europe2017.finovate.com/
http://europe2017.finovate.com/

At Finovate 2017 in London last week, I was struck firstly by the intensity of this pace – the leaps that tech has taken over the past year, but also, and more importantly, by the spirit of partnership.

No longer are we in a world where competition is about being the fastest or the smartest, we are living in a world where winning is about bundling those that are faster and smarter than you into meaningful solutions for the business you are in, and the clients that you serve.

In banking it’s too late for us to say “let’s build our own” or “let’s throw money at disruption”; we need to get our heads around connecting fintech dots to build the best solutions for our clients. In biometrics and authentication, the solutions are overwhelming, similarly in app design and integration.  Banking is less and less about paper trails and complicated products and more about integrating whole life solutions with ease of use and integrated platforms. It’s not at all about selling products and more about connecting the right client to the appropriate product they need for the time of their life that they are in – most often aided by a funkily named chatbot.  The world of social media and banking have converged already (yup ship sailed), payments is fast becoming something everyone does …everyone! We can already buy packaged analytics and information about pretty much anything we need.

Banking has morphed from functional practicality to gorgeous design, insightful user experience and lifestyle products that adjust to the needs of its customers. Tricky thing is that much of that “banking” isn’t coming from banks! So what on earth should banks be doing?

Concentrating? Yes. Trying to keep up? No. Collaborating? Absolutely!

Finovate entrepreneurs brought solutions to banking problems we never even knew existed. They challenged views of what banks do and encouraged us all to ask “how can we help you help us help our clients?”  More importantly though, they showed what collaboration brings.  Over and over as the 7 minute spots passed by, it was clear that these entrepeneurs are building on what each other are building.  Each using bits of what others had built, to supersize the solutions they were prototyping.

And that is the way to stay in the race! So as we train for the year ahead, we need to make sure we have the insight to navigate the way forward, the partnerships with fintechs to supersize our banking offerings and the deep relationships with clients to package this stream of incredible ideas in ways that makes them not only satisfied but thrilled with the way they interact with our ecosystem.

by Liesl Bebb Mckay

Our book is yet unwritten

2016 was a year of discovery, of adventure, of breaking boundaries. For many it’s been a year of unparalleled innovation – especially for those of us that live in experimental spaces. We’ve long known that innovation is for the brave – those souls who dare to speak out, the curious ones asking “But who says?”.
As I reflect on bravery or courage or heroism, it dawns on me that bravery in any of its forms is remarkably like crazy – or is this simply a matter of perspective?

2016 was a year of discovery, of adventure, of breaking boundaries.  For many it’s been a year of unparalleled innovation – especially for those of us that live in experimental spaces. We’ve long known that innovation is for the brave – those souls who dare to speak out, the curious ones asking “But who says?”

img_6768As I reflect on bravery or courage or heroism, it dawns on me that bravery in any of its forms is remarkably like crazy – or is this simply a matter of perspective? Much of our lives as innovators requires us to quiet the voices in our heads yelling out “You can’t do that! It’s crazy!”. And it’s exactly this act of changing perspective that allows us to see possibility and create a new future – to disrupt our worlds. It takes a special kind of crazy to question assumptions that are years old, to challenge ideals and concepts that work well enough, to be that person in the room asking “why?”

In Adam Grant’s “Originals” (if you haven’t read it yet, what are you waiting for? It’s incredible!), he speaks about “Vuja De” –  the obvious reverse of Déjà vu – the concept of facing something familiar but seeing it with a fresh perspective that enables new insights into old problems.

In today’s world of work, one of the biggest issues we face is creating spaces where people can bring their excellence, where the uniqueness of the individual can be expressed to create winning innovation.  How do we create that winning culture?

For years we’ve followed the rules on how “work” is, a kind of imaginary Encyclopaedia Britannica of how we work. But that imaginary book was written before “we” were working! It was written before many of “us” entered the world of work! Us being women and millennials and innovators and also closet creatives, and evening gardeners and day-time-suit-wearing-iron-men and also… well, most everyone.

Let’s face it, this book was written for a bunch of folk who are now in the minority. And don’t get me wrong, it worked really really well back then, but for “us” in the workplace now, it really does fall short. Many of us feel that our workplaces just don’t enable the way we need to work. So why then are we still using that imaginary book as our core reference guide?

That way of work was perfect for specific workplaces, for a workforce that were all very similar (or were told that they had to be) and for a time that was, well…industrial revolution. We’re in a whole new time, with a whole new workforce, and yet – there is no new book!  We have moved from a world where work was about creating consistency, to a world where work is about embracing each individual’s unique contribution and, if we wish to see that reality, it means we are going to need that bravery to change our worlds of work.

img_6779And it’s right about at this point that I hear Natasha Bedingfield belting out “I’m just beginning, the pen’s in my hand, ending unplanned” and then…a great big ol’ penny drops…it’s time to do some re-writing!

In 2017 I’m keen to see these new chapters take shape.  Let’s take the time to write “the Wikipedia of work” for our future, one that works for us, one that creates space for innovation, for creativity, one that allows every person to thrive, one that isn’t creating a whole workforce of ill-fitting pegs.

We have already rewritten the chapter on dynamic working (literally rewritten), but there are still many chapters that we haven’t even begun to write. We’ve only just started the chapters on what the world of work look could like for single moms? What about the chapters on working dads? Or insomniacs? Or those that live far from their workplaces? Or nocturnals?

And what about the chapter on success? Does it still mean becoming the CEO? Really? What is success if you believe in balancing family and sport and work and creative hobbies? What could that chapter look like?

And what is a career? Is it really a straight-line 20-year plan? What if there was a chapter on changing careers mid-way? Or one on taking a break from your career? Or one on how to come back after a break?

Now is the time for a massive cultural innovation.  It’s the time for new chapters. It’s time for all you brave crazies out there to start recreating, it’s time to get writing. Take it home Natasha… “Live your life with arms wide open, today is where your book begins, the rest is still unwritten”

by Liesl Bebb-McKay

Brain food for the festive season

If you are looking for a bit of inspiration over the holiday season then have a look at some of our team’s favourite TED talks all wrapped up in a festive poem.

foundery-christmas-banner-image

As the year comes to an end with the festive season in full swing,
Perhaps you’d like to watch a little something inspiring!

If you only have three minutes here is one to make you smile,
Or get yourself some radical wisdom if you have a while.

Andrew can help you if you have a story waiting to hatch;
You’ll need tissues nearby when you see this windmill made from scratch!

Can you relate to a master procrastinator who shares what’s in his head?
Or if you have cool science to share then listen to what Melissa said.

Finally, don’t miss your chance to see these amazing drones fly!
And with that, from us at Foundery: Go well! ‘Till next year! Goodbye!

christmas-hat-2

If rhyming couplets aren’t your thing then here is a more systematic list of some of our team’s favourite TED talks:

  • Terry Moore – How to tie your shoes (2:59)
  • Ricardo Semler – Radical wisdom for a company, a school, a life (21:42)
  • Andrew Stanton – The clues to a great story (19:09)
  • William Kamkwamba – How I harnessed the wind (5:59)
  • Tim Urban – Inside the mind of a master procrastinator (14:03)
  • Melissa Marshall – Talk nerdy to me (4:34)
  • Raffaello d’Andrea – Meet the dazzling flying machines of the future (11:35)

 

If you enjoyed these and you want more then go to ted.com/surpriseme where you can specify the amount of time you have and the kind of talks you’d like to see (jaw-dropping, beautiful, informative, etc.) and the algorithm will curate something for you there and then.

Thank you to everyone from the Foundery team who contributed to the compilation of this list by sharing their favourite TED talks!

by Bryony Martin

Fintech and Graffiti – Distant Cousins

Buzzwords such as innovation, disruption and FinTech seem to be so popular that they have found their way into almost all spheres of life. In this article, however, I feel the need to reintroduce a long-lost cousin, graffiti.

Buzzwords such as innovation, disruption and FinTech seem to be so popular that they have found their way into almost all spheres of life. In this article, however, I feel the need to reintroduce a long-lost cousin, graffiti.

About 9 months into our journey, the Foundery team had seen multiple new partners join the initiative. It was therefore pertinent to pull everyone away from their beloved desks, get together as a team and get to know each other a bit better. After searching far and wide we decided to partner with The Talking Vandals (https://www.facebook.com/thetalkingvandal) for a graffiti team building.  The Talking Vandals structured the event for us utilising graffiti as a medium to explore concepts that have been pervasive in the graffiti world and that can be applied in the new business domains of innovation and disruption. Three of these concepts resonated with us at the Foundery:

Graffiti Principle 1 – Know your history

Any graffiti artist that wants to be taken seriously needs to have a thorough understanding of the graffiti sub-culture and its history. Graffiti artists pride themselves on knowing about pieces of work in their area and the story behind these pieces. Before we got to the painting, The Talking Vandals gave us a crash course in graffiti culture and terminology so that we could better understand what we were about to do.

In the worlds of Fintech and disruption this too is a critical piece of the puzzle. Knowing the history of how existing systems and solutions evolved is the first step in understanding how to disrupt them.

Graffiti Principle 2 – Plan

tyrone-2

You would be mistaken if you assume that graffiti artists pitch up at a wall (or any other surface) and just “wing it”. These pieces of art are carefully designed and planned. The mural that we painted was planned in numerous layers beforehand and even rendered in photoshop. Print-outs of the plan were distributed to all team members on the day so that we could all picture the final masterpiece. These plans, however, still allowed team members room to add their own flair to the mural.

Salim Ismail is a director of Singularity University. In his book, Exponential Organizations, Salim outlines a common trait between all companies that show exponential growth: a Multi-Transformational Purpose (MTP). Both the graffiti plan and an MTP enable the team to focus on a common goal while still allowing enough room for individuals within the team to flex their creative muscles.

Graffiti Principle 3 – Don’t be a Toy

tyrone-3

Finally, some slang! In the graffiti subculture a Toy is slang for… well let’s just say that people labelled as Toys are considered undesirables and you wouldn’t collaborate with an artist that you considered a Toy.

Innovation and disruption is not easy. Teams will often find themselves fighting in the trenches together. Would you choose to have a Toy with you? Fundamental to any high performing team is the team members’ ability to interact with each other as humans. To be able to create something beautiful, it is critical therefore to ensure first that you construct your teams with human beings that can co-exist in the same space and only then focus on understanding the required skill sets.

The team thoroughly enjoyed spending the day with the Talking Vandals. Along with sharing in a part of the graffiti sub-culture, we had the opportunity to watch two amazing artists apply their skill and it was a treat. It is no surprise that we could learn about the disruption world from graffiti artists who have been disruptive in their own world for much longer. We look forward to applying some of these principles in how we disrupt the world of corporate and investment banking.

by Tyrone Naidoo

5 simple steps to turning ideas into reality

Fintechs — and start-ups in general — are many and varied and, although we are definitely leaps ahead of the banking of the past, we still have work to do in creating sustainable change in the banking ecosystem. Here are 5 simple steps we believe can get you to meaningful banking transformation.

aeroplane-boyFintechs — and start-ups in general — are many and varied and, although we are definitely leaps ahead of the banking of the past, we still have work to do in creating sustainable change in the banking ecosystem. Here are 5 simple steps we believe can get you to meaningful banking transformation.

Before we get into the details, a small spoiler alert is necessary…simple does not mean easy. In many cases, simple means quite the opposite of easy…you need to lose weight? (Don’t we all?) The solution is simple — quit sugar, kill the complex carbs, eat small meals and exercise at least 3-4 times a week — you see it’s simple!

But, we all know it’s not that easy. When that alarm goes off at 5am on a winter’s morning, how easy is it to drag yourself, your internal maniac kicking and screaming, from your delicious, cosy warm cocoon? Or when that 3pm slump hits and the vending machine choccies lure you closer with promises of joy and comfort and everlasting fulfilment, how easy is it to keep the craving at bay? You get the point.

In creating the necessary change for the banking ecosystem, we can apply 5 simple (but not easy) steps:

STEP 1: BELIEVE IN POSSIBILITY

Boy in boxIf you believe that change is an imperative, and if you know that you need to create an impact in the banking space, then believe that you can change your world — and you will. A person who believes deeply is infectious — the stronger your belief, the more infectious your ideas, and the more profound the impact you can make.

Shifts always begin with a great idea and a great passion — if you have the idea or passion, trust that you can make it happen. Note to self: if you could believe in Santa Claus for like 8 years, you can believe in yourself for like 5 minutes…you’ve got this!

We have a massive amount of data in our heads that gets drowned out in the daily hubbub. We don’t need to hire a consultant or an expert to solve the problem for us…“they” or “the head of” or “the consultant” don’t know the answer that you already know — you know your business better than anyone else, you know your client better than anyone else, and you know the dissatisfaction better than anyone else — you just need the time to figure it out.

STEP 2: BUILD A TEAM THAT BELIEVES WITH YOU

There is something magical in the power of a pack. “For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack.” ― Rudyard Kipling, The Jungle Book.

Once you begin the disruption conversation, you will realise the overwhelming number of others who believe that change is an imperative and who are looking for a place to make a difference.

Influence can be as powerful as the individual, but impact can be exponentially improved as a small team. Disruption in banking requires significant influence and (by definition) uncomfortable change by challenging assumptions. You will need a powerful pack with you in this journey. That may mean partnering differently or with players you have not considered allies in the past.

STEP 3: UNDERSTAND THE DIARY OF DISSATISFACTION

boxing-with-robotInnovation always stems from need. We identify needs most easily when they aren’t met. We need to be better at recording, and then challenging, our daily dissatisfactions.

Very few ideas actually happen in a flash of blinding clarity. All big solutions start with just a hunch. We circle around them for a long time before we finally hit the mark (and most often, a whole group of people hit the mark at the same time) and it’s the bravest who get the glory — think Darwin.

So what dissatisfaction exists in delivering the needs for banking as we define them? And, be brutally honest about what this dissatisfaction is — don’t just pick the easy answer. Opportunity exists when there is a frustration or a barrier to entry. What people want doesn’t change — how they get it does.

STEP 4: FEEDBACK IS YOUR FRIEND

As a leader of change, you really need to know who you are leading. To create sustainable disruption, you need to test your thinking — widely, and repeatedly! Feedback is a powerful tool in honing the product you have and the language that will be appropriate for your organisation. You’ve probably heard the rule of mathematics: if it feels easy, you’re doing it wrong.

In the rest of life, if it feels too difficult you are doing it wrong, especially when it comes to creating change. Each organisation will require its own language and its own solutions. If it feels too difficult, get feedback and tweak the strategy until it begins to feel right for you.

To make an impact, we have to accept that we will fail in some way. So, what are you waiting for? The only way to get to an answer is to experiment. Experimentation in a highly regulated industry sounds pretty frightening – but remember that if the frustration or barrier to entry make delivering the need too difficult — there will be disruption — you are going to have to experiment with how to do that yourself. We are taught from tiny that failure really isn’t a great idea, and in banking even more so, but if you are going to be a really disruptive, you need to create an environment where good and bad ideas are embraced…simple….not easy.

STEP 5: KEEP ON KEEPING ON

Rocket boyThere will be failures and mistakes and difficult conversations, but each of these acts as an opportunity to adjust the strategy and to refocus on the end goal. In these moments, remember the steps: believe in possibility, the pack is bigger than the wolf, get into conversation, seek feedback and just keep on keeping on.

We said at the outset that these steps may not be easy. So, how do you start? It’s a simple case of ready, steady, GO! Just like quitting sugar, if you know your end goal and the reason you need to achieve it, you can access the power within you and then just start. Drag off those warm winter covers, say no to the vending machine and take the first step. The beginning may not be easy, but once you’re on the road it feels pretty great, and the satisfaction as you see the change happen is well worth the effort.

by Liesl Bebb-McKay