Design Indaba made me do it –

This was the mantra for the 22nd annual Design Indaba conference, hosted by the beautiful city of Cape Town at the Artscape theater.

This was the mantra for the 22nd annual Design Indaba conference, hosted by the beautiful city of Cape Town at the Artscape theater.

The Design Indaba Conference has grown to become one of the world’s leading design events and hosts more than 40 speakers and 2 500 delegates. It draws creatives from all spheres and industries to come together under one roof to share knowledge, inspire and to collaborate with one another.

We talked, mingled and networked; filing our inspiration tanks. There were graffiti artists, dj’s, musicians, sculptors and various sponsor pop-ups and activation units, inviting us into this world of endless possibility and creativity.

Contrary to current perception, Design Indaba is not a conference ONLY for creatives – it is for everyone, from any field of expertise that would like to ignite their senses and intrigue their minds. It’s a jam packed 3 days and I believe that there is something that will speak to anyone’s core. This year was my first Design Indaba and it was a truly immersive experience, exceeding all my expectations.

The main highlight for me, wasn’t the skill or talent of all these amazing people (even though that was incredible) – but rather their thinking, this really stood out to me; they took us on a journey through the lens and into their magical minds!

Ultimately, Design Indaba wants to change the thinking of the world, one conference at a time, one creative at a time, and one business at a time.

It will take a generation of creative thinkers and implementers to see a turnaround. Design Indaba’s primary aim therefore is “to advance the cause of design as a communication fundamental, a business imperative and a powerful tool in industry and commerce, awakening and driving a demand for investment in intellectual capital”.

Investing nearly two decades in this vision, Design Indaba has championed the creative revolution. Here are some of my highlights from the 3-day event (content supplied from the Design Indaba weekly mailer):

The enchanted forest – Can beauty redeem us?

We were welcomed into the Design Indaba Festival 2017 through an enchanted forest of massive tree sculptors that were beautiful and surreal.

These tree sculptures were on exhibition the entire conference and created a magical ambience to the atmosphere in the festival court yard. I felt like I was walking around in a world that was a mash-up of the movies, Labyrinth and Alice in Wonderland (Tim Burton version).

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Capturing Cape Town’s scent with Kaja Solgaard Dahl

The thank-you gift for the festival this year was created by this designer, Kaja Dahl, she is fascinated with creativity that uplifts our experience and affect the senses directly.

Her process and the end-product is captivating and just incredible. She truly did capture the scent of Cape Town –whimsical, fresh, enlighten, yet eccentric.

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Masters in the art of freestyling it

One of my main highlights of the festival was the amazing group called Freestyle Love Supreme. They would wrap up each day with freestyle rap and beat boxing. They were so entertaining and funny, I laughed so hard that may face hurt.

The Design Indaba team chatted to Freestyle Love Supreme ahead of their Design Indaba daily wrap ups and once-off performance on the Thursday at Nightscape.

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Swahili launches on Duolingo

At Design Indaba 2017, Luis Von Ahn launches the first African language course on Duolingo. The audience went wild when he told us, he then went on to say that the second African language they will be launching will be Zulu. We can’t wait to see more African languages on this amazing app.

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Arch For Arch: A coda for Design Indaba Festival Day 3

The spectacular finale of the 2017 Conference and a tribute to Archbishop Desmond Tutu. It was a great honor and privilege for me to be a part of this amazing ceremony and to hear the incredible and humble, Archbishop Desmond Tutu talk. It was a great way to end the amazing festival, I left feeling inspired

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Thank you for the wonderful experience and we are looking forward to where they go from here.

So, if you think that design indaba isn’t for you – think again. Book your ticket for next year and immerse yourself.

by Mari-Liza Monteiro

 

 

 

 

Why it took 400 years to invent the wing

You would be forgiven for thinking the three photographs below were various “Wright Flyers” piloted by renowned flight pioneers Wilbur and Orville Wright. They’re not – They are photographs of different flights that took place at roughly the same time…

THE MYSTERY OF SIMULTANEOUS INVENTION

You would be forgiven for thinking the three photographs below were various “Wright Flyers” piloted by renowned flight pioneers Wilbur and Orville Wright.

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NPS.gov
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Wright-brothers.org

 

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They’re not – They are photographs of different flights that took place at roughly the same time as the famous Wright brothers’ flight. Not all of these inventors knew of each other’s existence prior to their inventions. This bizarre case of “simultaneous invention” has occurred many times before, and since, the Wright brothers’ flight. The polio vaccine was developed by three separate scientists almost at once. The patent for the telephone was filed by two separate individuals on the same day.

Why does innovation occur simultaneously? We tend to have an idealised view of how scientists work. We have a picture of an individual in a workshop making a few sketches and shouting out in joy at having thought of the wing. If this was indeed the case, then the occurrence of simultaneous inventions would almost defy logic.

The reality is that the inventors and innovators captivate the views, thoughts and ideas of their day as well as existing technology, and it is this trait, that explains the phenomenon of simultaneous discovery.

The story of fixed-wing self-powered flight

The first recorded study of flight was Leonardo Da Vinci’s “Codex on the Flight of Birds” in 1505. John Smeaton was the first to attempt to quantify the phenomenon of lift prior to 1800. Using the concept of lift, George Cayley just after 1800 conceived the concept of cambered airfoil and made the world’s first glider. The glider could barely move any practical distance. Otto Lilienthal, in 1889, took experimentation to a new level. By absorbing the thoughts of his day, he made an astonishing 2500 glides and documented his findings in the famous “Lilienthal tables”. The Wright brothers could not emulate the data in the Lilienthal tables because of an error in the concept developed by Smeaton over 100 years earlier. Out of frustration, they went over and above Lilienthal’s experiments by creating the world’s first rudimentary wind tunnel. They realised that “camber”, “aspect ratios” and “angle of attack” all contributed to various lifts. And so, 398 years after its first study, Wright Wing Number 31 was selected for the historic flight. The wing, by itself, was insufficient for the flight – they had to procure the latest internal combustion engine to power the plane. Luckily for them, this had been developed in parallel, and with its own intricate history. The Wright brothers, by profession, were bicycle manufacturers, not backyard inventors or carpenters – the perfect candidates for flight pioneers. Think light weight rivets, spokes, wheel rims and tubes.

The Adjacent Possible explains simultaneous discovery

The same fascinating story can be found in numerous other inventions such as the Gutenburg press. The movable type, the press, paper and ink all have stories of the their own. And few of them were traced back to “Eureka” moments. Steven Johnson first proposed the concept of an adjacent possible which originally has its roots in microbiology. As Steven Johnson writes in the Wall Street Journal:

“the [adjacent possible] boundaries grow as you explore them. Each new combination opens up the possibility of other new combinations. Think of it as a house that magically expands with each door you open. You begin in a room with four doors, each leading to a new room that you haven’t visited yet. Once you open one of those doors and stroll into that room, three new doors appear, each leading to a brand-new room that you couldn’t have reached from your original starting point. Keep opening new doors and eventually you’ll have built a palace.”

We can therefore argue that no matter how much of a genius Da Vinci was, he could not have possibly made a flying machine back in 1505. He was not at the boundary of the adjacent possible. He most certainly contributed to it as he was part of the enlightenment and laid the early foundations of putting innovative thoughts on paper. John Smeaton’s lift equation was wrong but it was a critical contribution in that it attempted to quantify the mysterious phenomena of lift into an equation and enabled Otto Lilienthal to record his famous tables.

What can Fintech Learn about the Adjacent Possible?

The story of the wing is an extreme case study of iterative innovations towards a single invention.

Players in the Fintech space could learn from this theme. Innovation happens on the boundaries of the adjacent possible. For example, crypto currencies could not be implemented prior to the ability to hold distributed ledgers on multiple databases connected in a common consortiumEureka moments are indeed rare. Innovation initiatives should reach out to the world to absorb the thoughts and ideas of the day. Businesses should look within their own boundaries to find their own “Lilienthal tables” – to see what worked and what didn’t, in order to innovate effectively.

The Palau island tribes did, in theory, implement a blockchain in 500AD but the “ledger” was effectively narratives held by the tribes elders

by Dejan Popovic

Looking through the exponential looking glass

We are now in what some are calling the next industrial revolution. In this time, we are experiencing exponentials more than at any other time in history. An example of this is the exponential decrease in the cost of solar electricity generating technology: the cost of electricity will, in our lifetime, tend to zero.

We are now in what some are calling the next industrial revolution. In this time, we are experiencing exponentials more than at any other time in history. An example of this is the exponential decrease in the cost of solar electricity generating technology: the cost of electricity will, in our lifetime, tend to zero. This not only allows us to solve our own electricity challenges here in South Africa but opens many possibilities on how we solve other challenges such as water security. With the cost of electricity tending to zero the business case for large scale desalination plants more realistic. Given that South Africa has just survived the worst drought in living memory many people are now conscious of water security and are looking for their own solutions.

 

I’ve just described some of the positive effects of exponentials. There are going to be some effects that will be harder humanity to deal with. Let’s consider another exponential that encapsulates artificial intelligence, deep learning and robotics. We already have driverless cars, experiments on primitive driverless cars began in the 1920’s – the technology is now mainstream. Whether human beings are ready for them is another question. The impact driverless cars have is profound, firstly we no longer need human drivers, secondly, we have fewer accidents as computers driver better than humans and thirdly all our current motor vehicles become obsolete and have little value other than in remote areas of the world.

 

Let’s extend a bit further into robotics and genetics. Robots will replace human farmers as they will be able to manage the entire farm. Crops will be farmed as raw materials for the advanced food printing technology. Animals will no longer be farmed as any protein can now be printed more cost effectively. Maintenance robots will maintain other robots as well as themselves. Food will be almost free as costs for electricity, water and robots are negligible. In this time of abundance human beings will live in homes built by machines, food, water, healthcare and education will all be free. Disease will be eradicated by genetic medicine that is printed at home after diagnosis by doctor robots. Our children will all have online tutors who are dedicated and configured to optimally educate each child. Humans may take real holidays from time to time but mostly they will prefer alternative reality holidays that they can take from the comfort of their homes.

 

In this time of great abundance, human beings have lots of time on their hands. With many needs met, people are looking to find purpose in their lives. There are many schools of thought around what we as humans will be focusing on. I believe that the simple answer is that humans will be looking forward at bigger challenges. Humanity has the gift of being able to manifest to the extent of imagination and now there will be focus on terraforming deserts on Earth into arable land, colonization of the Moon and Mars. Since very few people have volunteered for Moon and Mars missions the robots are sent to establish good living conditions before humans move in earnest. Humanity has finally closed the ecological divide – that is the divide in the mind of humans between their actions the impact on the planet. Technology has been very useful in helping to undo the sins of the past, vast ships extract plastics from the ocean. Localized plants remove toxins from the air. Genetically modified plants and animals extract poisons from our waterways. Ecosystems begin to re-establish after animal farming stops. Nature reserves still exist to contain the more dangerous animals.

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Exponentials are the key to these dramatic shifts in the world and these changes may happen faster than we think. We are experiencing exponentials in almost every aspect of our lives, look forward to profound positive changes for both humanity and the Earth soon.

by Jason Suttie

 

Intentional Simplicity

I believe that in this time we live in more than any other that came before it we are dealing with exponentials. Exponential growth, exponential challenges and exponential solutions. This theme manifests into both daily life and our businesses, and since our businesses are technology driven into technology too.

intentional-simplicity-v3I believe that in this time we live in more than any other that came before  it we are dealing with exponentials. Exponential growth, exponential challenges and exponential solutions. This theme manifests into both daily life and our businesses, and since our businesses are technology driven into technology too. Exponential translates to the sheer number of technology choices we now have when solving the needs of our businesses. While in principle I believe this is positive it also brings with it the potential for complexity. Complexity inherently is required in some cases, it’s the unnecessary complexity we need to guard against.

Another consideration is the way we approach problems. How is it that we find ourselves with “legacy solutions”? For me it’s quite simply two things: firstly, we’ve allowed ourselves to reach that position and secondly we have not been consciously optimising for the right things. What do I mean by this?  Simply put, life is about choices – if we consciously or unconsciously chose to allow legacy this was our doing. Often legacy is the unintended outcome of optimising for only a few dimensions such a delivery velocity, business functionality over sustainability. This talks to organizational culture and whether a culture of refactoring exists – this however is not the only consideration.

So the meta question for me becomes: since we have been building software for decades what can be done differently to achieve a different and more sustainable outcome. As it happens there is much research on the subject of IT complexity. My experience is that IT complexity mirrors business complexity – this my interpretation of Conway’s Law. I believe that while this is true, how we consciously promote intentional simplicity comes down to how we think, design, architect and ultimately build.

The fundamental shift that one needs to make is to move away from viewing businesses as being supported by platforms towards a capability view of an organisation. The capability organisational approach prescribes that you need to break down your business into capabilities. Capabilities are at a granularity where they describe related sets of business functions, for example: valuation and settlement are two capabilities in a bank. Once you have done your business architecture work we can start talking about how you apply a new architecture approach. Enter the Snowman or Simple Iterative Partitions (SIP) architecture:

 

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The Snowman Architecture talks about creating “Snowmen” for each capability – essentially a small system for each capability. Business functionality is achieved by linking the required capabilities together by means of a messaging bus in accordance with a defined business process.

The head of the snowman contains the Business Architecture – practically what this contains is business logic which itself is comprised of the capability business process and related business rules. The belly of the snowman holds the Technical Architecture or technical implementation of this business logic as it pertains to the capability business process. The arms of the snowman represent the Service Architecture or service endpoints by which bidirectional communication is achieved through well-defined interfaces and through which snowmen interact. The base of the snowman encapsulates the Data Architecture which contains the data itself as well as the mechanism through which the belly of the snowman interacts. It must be noted that the head of the snowman must only interact with the belly which in turn interacts with the base – in this way we ensure design consistency.

Right so we’ve been through the theory, lets walk through a practical example of a snowman built for a valuation capability – a simple example. The capability is required to provided valuations of products given product characteristics and market data. Given this need the service endpoints (arms) of the snowman have a method that describes the interface that allows products to be valued given characteristics C and market data M. This method is implemented in the belly of the snowman, in the implementation the belly queries the head of the snowman for the valuation algorithm given C and M. The head applies the relevant business logic to return the correct algorithm. Once returned this algorithm is executed and both the method input and outputs stored in the data layer (base) of the snowman before the valuation result is returned by means of the service endpoint.

So I understand the approach, can you articulate some of the benefits? Sure, following the example above we can easily test our valuation capability. We understand its interfaces and expected outputs for a given data set. When we change our mind on how valuation will be done we simply build a new valuation snowman with the same interfaces and plug it in alongside the existing one for parallel run before we ultimately switch off the old snowman. We understand dependencies as these are articulated in the service data contract. Capabilities are highly re-usable. The most powerful value proposition for the Snowman approach is that we can achieve true composition – in other words solutions can be composed for business by linking capabilities. The outcome of this composition ability is that it allows us to move product to market at great velocity.

Is the Snowman the end, certainly not, adoption of this approach talks to the conscious mind shift that we’ve made towards intentional simplicity.

by Jason Suttie