The changing world around programmers

In today’s ever-changing world, we find that businesses have become more concerned about what you can do rather than what qualification you have.

Gabriel blogIn today’s ever-changing world, we find that businesses have become more concerned about what you can do rather than what qualification you have. This paradigm is becoming more apparent as companies have an unbelievable shortage of decent coders who are able to deliver to their expectations. This gap in the employment market is increasing as the average university turnout of BSc Computer Science graduates is far less than actual demand.

 This situation has led the industry to change the way they look at qualifications and to focus more on a person’s ability to code and learn. If you are a self-taught coder and have an understanding of industry-relevant technology, you are in a much better position than someone who still has to go into university and learn coding there for the first time. A few companies are willing to take the risk of hiring someone without formal coding qualifications, and have reaped the rewards in taking those risks. The coders that they hire generally seem to be more aware of what new technology is available, and are more willing to learn something new in order to help them grow further.

 We are starting to see a paradigm shift in the industry and the way in which people think. The stack overflow statistics show that the proportion of self-taught developers increased from 41.8% in 2015 to 69.1% in 2016. This shows that a lot of developers are self-taught and a lot more people are teaching themselves how to code each year. People who start to code from a young age show such passion for coding and in combination with their curiosity for learning something new, their love for it speaks volumes. To have the ability to create anything that they can think of on a PC, and to manipulate a PC to behave like they want it to and have a visual representation of this, is unbelievable.

 For those interested in teaching themselves how to code there are many websites to look at. Here is a list of 10 places you can learn coding from, but I will list the top 3 places that I learnt the most from:

Those websites have their own way of teaching code and if youcombine this with some Youtube videos from CS50 and MIT OpenCourseWare you will be all set to learn at your own pace. Hackerrank is a good way to test everything you learnt and you can see how you rank against the world.

 WeThinkCode_ is an institution to learn coding, for anyone from ages 17-35 years old. Their thinking is that you do not need to have a formal qualification to be a world class coder. More institutes like this are opening across the world. Having a wide age gap illustrates that you are never too old to learn how to code. There are also more and more coding education opportunities for young people. It is really easy to learn how to code from a young age as that is when your mind is at its prime to learn new things and adjust to constant change.

 In a programmer’s world you are constantly learning new things and this is what makes our jobs exciting.

The world is ever-evolving and we all need to keep adjusting our mindsets on how we look at things, otherwise we will be left behind while everyone moves forward.

By Gabriel Groener

The Modern Programmer

IT professionals often don’t get an honest portrayal in the entertainment industry and, for better or worse, the mass perception of Computer Science has been influenced by what people see on their TV screens. Either we sit in a dingy dark room, littered with empty energy drink cans, staring at a terminal with green font flashing and passing by at light speed – with sound effects, or we are cool rich guys creating programs that become self-aware.

IT professionals often don’t get an honest portrayal in the entertainment industry and, for better or worse, the mass perception of Computer Science has been influenced by what people see on their TV screens. Either we sit in a dingy dark room, littered with empty energy drink cans, staring at a terminal with green font flashing and passing by at light speed – with sound effects, or we are cool rich guys creating programs that become self-aware. There really isn’t a middle ground and these perceptions either drive people to developing an insatiable curiosity in the field or becoming fearful and believing that they aren’t mentally fit to join the club.

http://i.imgur.com/heb9csO.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/heb9csO.jpg

The demographic of the modern programmer isn’t what it was back in the 70’s. Most IT professionals were – well…Professionals. They were mathematicians, engineers, scientists, accountants, etc. often in their 30’s or 40’s. The programming industry was almost 50% women. What on earth happened?

Well, I have a theory. Computer Science (CS) wasn’t a course at any universities at that time, so youngsters really had no way of entering the field. Not to mention the fact that what they called a computer back then isn’t what we have today. They were big, expensive and obviously fewer. There were no operating systems. They wrote code by hand which was then converted into punch cards that could be fed into the computer and you had better pray that what you wrote was correct – which, if you code, you know it often isn’t – because then you would have to start that lengthy process from scratch. Blessed are those that came before us, for they were a resilient few. By the time we had a CS course it was the 80’s and young adults could learn how to code.

http://i.imgur.com/27vs3iD.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/27vs3iD.jpg

The 80’s was definitely one of the most defining times in modern history. We saw technology really being embraced in the media. Back to the Future, Ghostbusters, Star Wars, Terminator and many more franchises showed us a world of technology that seemed almost impossible. In lots of ways we are still catching up the imaginations of the filmmakers and science fiction writers. But I find this time very interesting because it gave birth to the geek culture which has lasted to this day. This culture was very young and male dominated. It was a kind of cult to those who were part of it. This must have driven the women away. Women in general still don’t get the culture. Heck, even I don’t get it to the degree of hardcore followers. Now think about how we perceive these “geeks” in society. Beady eyed, brace faced, drooling, good-grade-getting teens with bad acne (is there good acne?) and thick glasses, always getting bullied by the “jocks”. Truth is, in a quest to fit in, teens only hang out with the group that they relate to and/or accepts them. Learning became the uncool thing and Disco was in. The media neatly crafted and packaged nerd culture. Being a cool kid meant you didn’t even greet the nerd – unless shoving someone into a wall counted as a greeting. And so that was that. Programmers were part of a culture that embraced creativity, logic and intelligence and frowned upon anything less, because in order to be a programmer you needed to love learning and solving problems. Being a cool kid meant you had to love partying, gossip and creating problems.

http://www.philiployd.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/geek.jpg
http://www.philiployd.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/geek.jpg

Things have changed somewhat. Programmers today come in different shapes and sizes. Still not many hourglass shapes, but we’re getting there. The next generation of teens will definitely be more in-tune with technology and the true culture of the geek or the “hacker”. Those that fail to see the power of new technologies will be left behind. Computers are so much more accessible and all schools are starting to teach coding. With innovative colleges like We Think Code and 42, the future of what we perceive as an IT professional will be completely different to what we have today.

we-think-code-banner (003)

It’s now up to us to make sure that our kids become programmers rather than the programmed. It’s in the small things that we spot the young coder. The little kid that breaks his/her toys to find out how they work. Kids are naturally curious and it’s up to us to nurture that curiosity and not reprimand or punish them for it. We interact with technology every day and we would only be empowering them by encouraging them to learn how to control that technology as creators in the same way that we might teach them how to play a musical instrument. I envision a world where the modern programmer is anyone, in a society that frowns on those that shun learning. Let’s make it happen.

by Sherwin Hulley

Our book is yet unwritten

2016 was a year of discovery, of adventure, of breaking boundaries. For many it’s been a year of unparalleled innovation – especially for those of us that live in experimental spaces. We’ve long known that innovation is for the brave – those souls who dare to speak out, the curious ones asking “But who says?”.
As I reflect on bravery or courage or heroism, it dawns on me that bravery in any of its forms is remarkably like crazy – or is this simply a matter of perspective?

2016 was a year of discovery, of adventure, of breaking boundaries.  For many it’s been a year of unparalleled innovation – especially for those of us that live in experimental spaces. We’ve long known that innovation is for the brave – those souls who dare to speak out, the curious ones asking “But who says?”

img_6768As I reflect on bravery or courage or heroism, it dawns on me that bravery in any of its forms is remarkably like crazy – or is this simply a matter of perspective? Much of our lives as innovators requires us to quiet the voices in our heads yelling out “You can’t do that! It’s crazy!”. And it’s exactly this act of changing perspective that allows us to see possibility and create a new future – to disrupt our worlds. It takes a special kind of crazy to question assumptions that are years old, to challenge ideals and concepts that work well enough, to be that person in the room asking “why?”

In Adam Grant’s “Originals” (if you haven’t read it yet, what are you waiting for? It’s incredible!), he speaks about “Vuja De” –  the obvious reverse of Déjà vu – the concept of facing something familiar but seeing it with a fresh perspective that enables new insights into old problems.

In today’s world of work, one of the biggest issues we face is creating spaces where people can bring their excellence, where the uniqueness of the individual can be expressed to create winning innovation.  How do we create that winning culture?

For years we’ve followed the rules on how “work” is, a kind of imaginary Encyclopaedia Britannica of how we work. But that imaginary book was written before “we” were working! It was written before many of “us” entered the world of work! Us being women and millennials and innovators and also closet creatives, and evening gardeners and day-time-suit-wearing-iron-men and also… well, most everyone.

Let’s face it, this book was written for a bunch of folk who are now in the minority. And don’t get me wrong, it worked really really well back then, but for “us” in the workplace now, it really does fall short. Many of us feel that our workplaces just don’t enable the way we need to work. So why then are we still using that imaginary book as our core reference guide?

That way of work was perfect for specific workplaces, for a workforce that were all very similar (or were told that they had to be) and for a time that was, well…industrial revolution. We’re in a whole new time, with a whole new workforce, and yet – there is no new book!  We have moved from a world where work was about creating consistency, to a world where work is about embracing each individual’s unique contribution and, if we wish to see that reality, it means we are going to need that bravery to change our worlds of work.

img_6779And it’s right about at this point that I hear Natasha Bedingfield belting out “I’m just beginning, the pen’s in my hand, ending unplanned” and then…a great big ol’ penny drops…it’s time to do some re-writing!

In 2017 I’m keen to see these new chapters take shape.  Let’s take the time to write “the Wikipedia of work” for our future, one that works for us, one that creates space for innovation, for creativity, one that allows every person to thrive, one that isn’t creating a whole workforce of ill-fitting pegs.

We have already rewritten the chapter on dynamic working (literally rewritten), but there are still many chapters that we haven’t even begun to write. We’ve only just started the chapters on what the world of work look could like for single moms? What about the chapters on working dads? Or insomniacs? Or those that live far from their workplaces? Or nocturnals?

And what about the chapter on success? Does it still mean becoming the CEO? Really? What is success if you believe in balancing family and sport and work and creative hobbies? What could that chapter look like?

And what is a career? Is it really a straight-line 20-year plan? What if there was a chapter on changing careers mid-way? Or one on taking a break from your career? Or one on how to come back after a break?

Now is the time for a massive cultural innovation.  It’s the time for new chapters. It’s time for all you brave crazies out there to start recreating, it’s time to get writing. Take it home Natasha… “Live your life with arms wide open, today is where your book begins, the rest is still unwritten”

by Liesl Bebb-McKay

Banking on the future

As we travel down the road to banking innovation and focus on attracting incredible talent, it’s becoming increasingly clear that we have a slight problem Houston…it seems that banks have a bad rap!

As we travel down the road to banking innovation and focus on attracting incredible talent, it’s becoming increasingly clear that we have a slight problem Houston…it seems that banks have a bad rap!

Where to lay the blame seems a little less clear…it could be the multiple crises over the last few decades, could be recent high-profile scandals, sensationalised movies and TV shows with hyper-villainous bankers, or tales of “great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity, relentlessly jamming its blood funnel into anything that smells like money” – whatever the cause, the reputation is certainly a little more tarnished than it was back in the day!

Now I’m not claiming that there is a whole lot of fireless smoke nor do I want to embark on a meaningless defensive diatribe, but I do feel compelled to encourage incredible talent back into the illustrious world of financial services.

GettyImages-168359274-FINAL_web

So, why is banking an exciting place to forge your career?

Firstly, banking has its heart in innovation – yes, innovation. Banking by definition sits in the middle of the economy and as much as that economy changes (all the time!) so must banking adapt. It is an industry that continually has to reinvent itself, continually innovating and redefining what it provides for its clients. Now, more than ever before, banks are feeling the pressure to reinvent themselves to thrive in a digital age and i future-proof the world of financial services. This is a great opportunity for innovators in non-traditional banking spheres to participate — engineers, developers, creatives, design experts — all have roles to play in the banking innovation ecosystem of the present and of the future. Diversity is essential for innovation. Banks are seeking talent from all walks of life and cultural shifts that have been slow in the past are accelerating as the industry recognises the need for great diversity of thinking.

Secondly, it’s a challenging and dynamic working environment. Banks are notoriously competitive, but it’s exactly that type of backdrop that allows you to participate in a highly stimulating career path. The opportunities for growth are immediate and long-lasting, and the energy and buzz that the environment provides create great opportunities for individual and team outperformance. Dynamic environments also have great scope for autonomy and mastery and, importantly, an opportunity to be part of creating a new future.

The industry is also one where learning is part of the everyday experience: banks are well known for structured in-house training, but they are also supportive of formal training programmes. Continual learning is essential for if banks are to continue to be innovative and is of great value to individuals working in the space as they follow their own development and leadership journeys.

And, lastly, we have fun! As we strive for lives where work and life come together, an industry that allows you to have fun while you work and that embraces your individual excellence in a great working environment is pretty appealing!

by Liesl Bebb-McKay

Listen to Liesl talking about RMB’s Athena programme on Classic FM here.  The Athena programme won the “Women Empowerment in the Workplace” award at the 2016 Gender Mainstreaming Awards.